Facebook will be able to see your nudes to save you


Facebook will be able to see your nudes to save you

Facebook offers users to send intimate images if they do not want them to be published by Ex or friend on Facebook, Messenger or Instagram. The security team gives some information about the program.

Faced with this scourge of the web called revenge porn (or revenge pornographic), Facebook is conducting a test in Australia, in partnership with the authorities, to prevent the publication of photos (the social network does not speak videos) intimate without the principal’s consent on Facebook, Messenger and Instagram.

Most of the current measures are based on reporting. If your photos have been published by someone, you must report them and Facebook will delete them.

This method has already proved its effectiveness, but it does not represent a complete solution. Indeed, once photos have been uploaded (even just 10 minutes), it is possible that someone has already kept a copy.

New proactive measures

What Facebook is testing in Australia is a program that allows the user to post photos before they are published. But for that to be possible, you have to send them to the number one social network. And that made a lot of buzz on the internet.

Moreover, Facebook’s security team gives some details. “With this new little pilot, we want to test an emergency option that allows people to proactively provide a photo to Facebook, so it’s never shared in the first place,” says Antigone Davis, the security boss. The letter also details the operation of this new program.

  • If an Australian thinks that intimate photos might end up on Facebook (for example, after a romantic relationship has gone wrong), he must first fill out a form on the eSafety Commissioner’s website, which then relays to Facebook.
  • The user must also send the images that can be used to make revenge porn on Messenger. As a result, Facebook will have access to it, but not the authorities.
  • When Facebook receives notification from the Australian authorities, “a specially trained representative” reviews these images and creates unique fingerprints that identify them.
  • A priori, it is the only moment where a human will see these intimate photos. Once the fingerprints are created, Facebook asks the user to delete the images on Messenger (which causes their removal of images from Facebook servers).
  • These are not the images that Facebook will store, but the prints. These fingerprints are enough to identify the files if someone tries to upload them to Facebook.